Sunday, June 21, 2015

A Few More Grids

Here are some of the grid pieces I did while at Pacific Northwest Art School a couple of weeks ago:







I was having fun playing with contrasting scales of pattern, as well as varying the colors, and the shapes and sizes of elements.  I did a few more on Friday:

Love this lipstick bright pink/red



I'm enjoying getting a bit more minimal.

These are small - all 8"x8" and will be mounted on wood panel.  Fun!

13 comments:

  1. Loving the impact and statement they make...agree with Sue make one feel very happy and playful. Awesome work.

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  2. Loving the impact and statement they make...agree with Sue make one feel very happy and playful. Awesome work.

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  3. What a compendium of ideas! You are incredible, your art is astonishing. I wonder - how would this look in a bigger scale.

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    1. I wonder that about everything I do! Thanks for the compliment. These are fun, and surprisingly challenging!

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  4. Ooooooh! Love, love, love the "bit more minimal" one. I think I must take your online composition class...whenever I go for sparse it just doesn't sit right.

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  5. Your work has amazing visual impact...not so easy for most of us.

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  6. Fun and happiness is what these pieces make me think of - an amazing collection!

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  7. I think about this going big question as well. However, it seems to me that when one "builds" paintings with collage that is based, literally, on hand sized techniques, it is hard to switch to a larger scale. Even the creative gestures and tools are different: large arm movements replace small ones, bigger brushes and implements are needed.

    For instance, scribbling and scratching that are calligraphic, gelli prints, monoprints using found objects and tools (like kitchen utensils), vegetation, etc, are all "small," life-sized, scaled to the size of our hands, like magazines and newspapers. If you tried to translate them directly to a large piece, you would have a myriad of tiny things on a big substrate.

    An artist I followed for quite some time used to make abstract collages out of magazine clippings. She put a chosen collage beside her easel and then "copied" it in watercolor to create larger paintings. She won many prizes--the technique worked for her.

    I have often wondered if this might be a beginning approach for increasing scale.

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    1. PS--Isn't this one of the things Fine Art America does, replicates a smaller version into a much bigger one? How successfully have smaller scale designs translated into larger ones there, in your experience?

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    2. EXACTLY! But I would die of boredom just copying a small piece onto large canvas. And winning prizes or selling work would not be a measure of success. It might be a more interesting challenge for some kinds of work (the artist you cite has the challenge or rendering in watercolor what she sees in magazine images), but mine would be utterly lifeless done this way. Your are right: Fine Art America can produce my small work as large prints, which is one main advantage of buying prints! Scaling up is a much more complex issue of finding new tools new gestures, new materials in some cases, new orientation towards the piece.

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