Tuesday, May 26, 2015

More Black and White and a Giveaway

I made a few more papers using stencils with a sponge roller, but also with the GelliArts gel plate.  On these I used Golden Fluid Acrylics (Carbon Black and Titanium White), and also Golden OPEN Acrylics, which have a very long working time (they dry slowly).

Here are a few of the papers I made, using 9"x12" Cheap Drawing Paper:
In this I used a stencil I made myself with Cheap Drawing Paper.


For this I used OPEN acrylic, and made the lines using a Q-tip.

For this one I used a homemade gelatin plate, 8"x8", and then a stencil over it.

 The following two images are digital collages studies.  They don't exist in actual material.  I was fooling around in Photoshop, manipulating the scale of each of my papers as I put them together in these pieces.  As I am investigating the issue of scale, I am wondering if making either digital studies or small paper studies might be useful.  I've never worked from studies, so it's a new process for me.




I am offering a giveaway of the 14-product set of Golden's A - Z Workshop In A Box, to one person, chosen at random from those who comment on this post.  Please say something about working in black and white, and/or something about scale.  I'm interested in your ideas.  Identify yourself uniquely (i.e. "Mary in San Diego" rather than "Mary").  I will post the winner on Thursday, May 28.  It is the responsibility of the winner to get in touch with me.

118 comments:

  1. Love the idea of working in b+w on the Gelliplate Jane! I really like to scan my art and then use Photoshop to experiment with differences in color, scale and composition.....feel much more free to experiment without fear of "messing" anything up!

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  2. Greetings from Raven in BC
    Jane, I remember your black and white studies from Art & Soul, Portland. I found them very powerful. I like shades of gray and the layering that gives depth to scribble marks and line work. I find B&W studies to be the consummate abstract presentation. It really highlights the composition aspects of the piece to be so simplistic in color but rich in tonal range. I like the play of opposites and the proportion and scale differences one can achieve...thick lines vs. thin, curves vs. straight, bold forms or shapes vs. quiet areas. Thanks for sharing!

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  3. Haven't worked in B & W much. Your studies make me want to! Love the diff in scale in your first study. I think using photoshop to preview designs is a great idea also.
    Kathi in Batavia NY

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  4. Love what you've done here (love everything you do, actually). I really like what you've been able to do with open acrylics on the Gelli plate. I also really love working with neutrals, b&w especially. I have a collage art journal I've been working on that is done entirely with neutrals. The possibilities are endless!

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  5. Always like your experimentation Jane! Thanks for sharing! I really enjoy working with a limited palette, it gives me so much challenge! I really have to try Black and White!
    Josée from Newmarket, ON

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  6. Interesting that you posted this today, very timely for me as I have recently decided to explore black and white in my art, due in part to Connie Rose's recent blog posts, and Jane, your work with the black ink and yupo a while back. Thanks for the chance....Anna in Oregon

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  7. I am always so inspired by your art posts! Thanks for including experimentation into your creative process, and making everything so clear.
    Leslie from NC

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  8. Great idea, as always!

    Elena from Dallas

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  9. I appreciate your tips for creating your own unique papers to incorporate into collages. It's very freeing to create these experimental papers that can end up being a starting point for new ideas. I prefer the first collage on this page. The eye moves through the composition more easily. Thank you for posting these inspirational techniques =)

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  10. i love working in black & white--
    working without color is some how freeing--
    thanks for the give away--

    cindy c (los angeles)

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  11. I retired recently and I'm very excited about pursuing my artful ideas! I love the mood that black and white sets.

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  13. Black and white always draws my eye no matter where I see it. Adding a color seems to distract from the picture for me.

    Jan in Vancouver WA

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  14. Hi Jane -- love your work ... I enjoy working w/ B&W because of the stark contrast you can create on paper .... it's a great "pop" in an art journal page too! Thanks!

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  15. I never worked in black and white until I took your sketchbook course and now I'm hooked!

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  16. I love your digital collage and how you changed the scale! And I am really inspired by your black and white paintings/prints. They are a great starting point for collages or other paintings. Really need to do it! (Anne Rehorn from Germany)

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  18. Look around you. What is real? What is consistent in all shapes and forms?

    Color. Once that is removed we take a step forward in abstraction. Black and white opens the doors to the unexplored.

    from Brian Sommers in Ohio.

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  19. I love black and white. Thanks for your videos Jane and the opportunity to win this package of goodies.
    Sheryll in Monument, CO

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  20. Working in black and white is a real challenge but the results can be so stunning! Thanks for everything you share!

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  21. I really enjoy your posts and videos, and I'm looking forward to the online class! Black and white always seems very sophisticated to me. I think trying it will be a good challenge because I tend to rely on color contrasts. I've really enjoyed the comments here too. Brian Sommers, I think you are right on the mark!

    Jane, as for scale, I have always admired how you fill the page with your art. It is interesting to see how the digital images enhance the differences in patterns/scale. I'm working on a collage piece for my nephew's guitar case right now, and scale definitely came into consideration with the paper choices.

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  22. Working in B&W allows you to easily see the values in your painting. It can be a good learning tool. Sharon in Park City Utah

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  23. I'm a big fan of bold, warm colors but the few times I do something that is only b/w I'm reminded of how cool and bold that can be too. For example I love typography, and making collages with just cut out letters is super fun. Give it a try.

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  24. Love lots of black with white markings. I find that painting pens are great for control of line and shape. I have several kinds and find your work inspiring.

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  25. Enjoying this series, esp. digital exs. Fabulous to be able to print YOUR paper in different scales! I scan my favorite painted papers & parts of paintings. Later, these can be printed to use in collage. Gelli plate is my go-to tool, so I could really use those Golden Open paints. Joyce in Big Sky Country.

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  26. I always loved the B&W papers we made in Extreme Comp. I am still using bits of them for collage.

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  27. I generally use vibrant bright colors, but I love your use of B/W and will have to give it a try. I love all your posts and hope to take a workshop with you one day. Vicki in Vancouver.

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  28. Working in b&w and a tiny little bit of color - that can be amazing... Or dangerous ;-). "Color is a dangerous thing. A little goes a long way." Mark English
    Jorin

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  29. I love bold colors, but painting in black and white will be something new and a challenge for me.
    Kind regards, Henriëtte

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  30. Love your work Jane. I lean more towards color, but am often amazed at the color achieved within the black and white. Sounds strange, but I go to b/w more often when it's cloudy? Go figure?
    jacki from socal.

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  31. Although I know you'll have over a 100 comments due to this very generous giveaway, I, as a watercolor artist and teacher find that watercolorists start out small - very small, so intimidated by a full sheet that often they never range past a fourth sheet (11 x 15). Once that full sheet (22 x 30) is embraced, though, there is a real freedom in it and the fear subsides. I imagine your work during the artist residence and loved the larger sizes on the wall - if you have a good wall to work on, I'd definitely go bigger just to explore it. If it doesn't work out as well, you can always shrink back down. For some reason, these black and white collage bits don't look like Jane Davies works - maybe they will in time but right now I think you are finding your way with them. I do really like the second painting, which incorporates your markmaking and looks more like you!

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  32. I have actually been playing more with black and white as I've been slowly learning to draw faces, then put the faces on something. I never thought of myself as an abstract artist but I am liking how playful working in abstract is. I get tense trying to be realistic and it is no fun.

    Confining a tonal spectrum to black/white is not limited as some would think. There is a glorious range of color within; then when adding just one more color to the mix - WOW! Talk about impact!!

    Jen Jezebel in CT

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  33. sue from Denver, love the one on the home made gelli plate.

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  34. I don't normally work in just black and white but I always find it refreshing and interesting. I have tried making my own collage papers with black paint and extra large sharpie paint pens(love these!) just drawing shapes and patterns and then copying them and making multiple prints to cut up and use again.
    thanks,
    nicole (san jose)

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  35. I love B&W but I love it even more after the sketchbook practice workshop. I see how
    B&W not only enhances the piece but offers the opportunity for a new color to peek through. I have tried some of your B&W stencil ideas and am now using the same stencil w/color over the B&W.
    and love it!

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  37. Hi Jane. I want to try painting with a sponge roller on a stencil but I have to get a sponge roller first. I tried a regular roller and it didn't work! I love art in black and white because it is so graphic. Peggy from laurel MD

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  38. I love experimenting with small b/w dots, dashes, crosses, etc....feels primitive and basic, and very engaging.

    Irene Peake

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  39. I have always loved black and white with a splash of color... Susan from Irvine ca

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  40. Black and white and one more color provides endless chances to express oneself. I like the sharp contrast with the soft nuance when adding a less intense version of black or the added color. Terry in Seattle

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  41. There's no doubt that B & W photos have a particular kind of visual impact. I find it the same with paintings. Bright colours aren't distracting from the subject or focal point. Your black and whites, using stencils, are really beautiful. Jo in Australia

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  42. love b&w....often after doodling B&W I am tempted to add colour...sometimes successfully and sometimes not. I am wanting to take a small corner of a small painting and do it on a larger scale.

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  43. I am so happy every time, l see your name on my email list. You do such interesting and imaginative painting/printing. I loved your black and white work and it encouiraged me to try some too! I LOVE colur and so trying b/w was a real struggle for me but l have so enjoyed it. Thank you. I also normally work BIG but .... l have done some small work using a tiny gelli plate and have been surprised at how liberating l have found it. So once again .... thank you for helping me to be more ... Open to things, l suppose. Oh dear! as usual l have talked too much ... sorry but l got carried away. :) good luck to everyone who enters this amazing give away! x Lynda

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  44. As I practice more often with black and white - I have discovered that I have the tendency to not want to stop until every bit of the paper is covered in marks! I really enjoy myself. I do find that the studies in which I've let some space just be quiet in whether black or white are the studies that seem to have more to say, if that makes sense. Thanks for all the lessons and inspiration - Jane!

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    Replies
    1. oops, a quick addendum - to my comment above - from Patty in Maryland. And a quick funny story - Jane, last week I thought that you had me seeing chickens! I live between Baltimore and Annapolis MD, when I stepped outside to take my dog, Zeke for a walk, I saw movement to the right and thought I saw a chicken! Two weeks later, I hear a rooster crow - my neighbors across the street took on some chickens and one of them had escaped! It was unexpected - but so cool! Anyway, back to more black and white studies - I took the sketchbook practice class online, fell behind, but I'm still working on my lessons. I have stacks of painted papers in various progressions - Love it!!! I felt pleased when I used a fan brush for a black wash exercise. (enough rambling....)

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    2. Hey, I had a dog named Zeke. He was a fabulous golden retriever, and died a few years ago. Thanks for the comment.

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  45. From following your blog and watching your tutorials for more than a year, I have come to love working in black and white. I also "pop in" a bit of either gold or bright red as an accent, using a trick that I learned from you i.e. using the eraser end of a regular pencil to make dots. I love doing that... especially with Golden Fluid acrylic Gold (fine) paint. I'm addicted :-)

    Susan in Chapel Hill

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  46. I have used printed text in my work, from dictionary's, found books and newspapers. I like the way that the larger the text the lighter the paper, and the smaller the text the darker the paper, it helps me to use a range of tones. You can also make your own papers by making a set of stamps graded in size, say from 1/8 inch to 2 inch circles. Black and white art, as in black and white photography is about tone. It also makes shape more importance, as colour has been excluded.
    Lynne from Yorkshire, UK

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  47. It is true we see most clearly in black and white, although we often believe it is color that is enhancing our image. I try to always step back from whatever I'm working on, no matter what the scale, and squint to see if the there are sufficient lights and dark to hold the viewer's interest in the piece.

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  48. I find when I work in black and white I feel free-er to experiment - I tend to play with size and shape more - placement and tones also come into play. I have scanned some images and cropped them in different ways - it's amazing how different things look in the computer. I like to go back to the original painting - crop it then use glazes to color them.
    Thanks for ideas for the geli-plate.
    Diane in Alberta Canada

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  49. Black & White - I love the simplicity combined with the drama. Somehow it's very peaceful and zen for me too. I like your handmade stencil, the home made gel plate image and the virtual studies. I, too, am working larger and am interested in the question of scale.
    Always so much to learn! Thanks, as always...... zoe from oregon

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  50. Working in b.ack and white is so freeing and allows me to focus on composition and design. Thanks for sharing your process. Very inspiring! Joan in Illinois

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  51. I love your posts and videos. I am just getting back into art after 35 years of teaching high school biology so all the information you give is valuable. A give away is just icing on the cake. Thanks for all the information you share so freely. SuiteLady from Minnesota.

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  52. I haven't really explored working in black and white. This post and the work you've been showing in b & w inspire me to play with this. I agree with Joan that it will really hone in on composition. Thanks for sharing and offering such a great giveaway. Sona in Austin

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  53. Even in my quilting days, a pop of black and white really added to interest to projects and now I find I can barely do a mixed media piece without these contrasting color elements. Since I am a 'color' person, I have painted swatch pages of my favorite colors, labeled them, and copied them in grayscale...so I can see which ones are truly gray in contrast value and incorporate those 'grays' into my work!

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  54. As far as scale goes, I am also a collage artist. I have sometimes made a small (8x8") collage and then wished to see it 40x60"! What I have done for that is to draw out the design, including all the shapes of the different collage pieces, then proceeded to paint on the large canvas, mimicking the patterns and textures of the original collage pieces. It is not the same as the small one, but it is very interesting in its own right. Because I hand paint/print all my own papers for collage, I think it's easier to paint the design, as opposed to making new papers with larger patterns on them and then try to get them to match the way they were on the small piece. I can send you pics of an example of this if you are interested!

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  55. Photoshop helps to visualize all sorts of things - yet another tool to learn.... Thanks for the share!
    SAD in Dallas.

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  56. I do believe it was YOU Jane that first had me playing around with brush strokes and black and white (perhaps some shades of grey too)! It was way out of my comfort zone as I am a color girl all the way but it has opened my artistic expression very much and I even dared send in to Stampington not long ago with a handful of black and white pieces(fingers crossed). So-thank you!! Very interested in seeing how you explore scale now:) Thanks for the generous giveaway opportunity.

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  57. Jane,

    I find black and white so compelling, so bold and powerful. Artworks make such a statement with only b&w. Oddly, I usually work small when playing with black and white, perhaps because of the graphic nature of the work. It's hugely fun, though, and very compelling. Thanks for offering the wonderful giveaway! Rebecca in Dallas.

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  58. Loving these pieces and the patterns your getting Jane.

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  59. I love working with black and white. Your work is inspiring, keep it up!

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  60. You always come up with something inspiring . . . and you've definitely inspired me to play around more with black and white. Thanks for being so generous with your ideas. Carol on the Oregon Coast (moving to Whidbey in a couple of weeks! Hoo ha! Coupeville as a matter of fact!)

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  61. I recently made an accordian book using only black and white. I made layers od black and white on deli paper using my gelli plate. I cut these into small pieces and added them randomly to the pages. This softened and enlivened thepiece...bea

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  62. Interesting....ideas are there...using monochrome of the B&W wold make an interesting project and using stencils that would enhance the project(s)

    Joyce

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  63. Hi Jane - the only black and white I've done are in photography. I watched the video of you using the Stencil Girl stencils last week. As far as scale and Photoshop, I think happy accidents are the way I've found great results. I know you will make some incredible artwork, as always. Wish I had suggestions. I love Golden products and usually enter your giveaways when I see them posted.

    From Marrianna in Flagstaff AZ USA

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  64. I struggle with B&W. I may doodle in black ink on white paper (usually as a small zentangle) but when I'm creating something that I expect to become art, I have a hard time not adding some colour. Then, it may be another monochromatic scheme or something more colourful as a background that gets ignored as I draw over it with black ink. When I think about it, the only time I can remember doing anything in B&W bigger than a zentangle tile was when I showed my son how to do a charcoal, winter landscape. I guess I have a challenge ahead of me now. Rebecca in Southern Ontario.

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  65. Somehow, learning to make a strong design in black and white teaches you so much about good composition. You cannot rely on color to carry the piece.

    from Barbara in PA.

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  66. As always your work is inspiring and stimulates me to want to play and explore and learn. With black and white in contrast I am always aware of the relationship between the dark and light and how they enhance and/or quieten as they interact.

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  67. My very recent attempts at plain air painting are teaching me to first assess a scene in terms of values as though I were viewing it in black and white (a few ranges of greys). Here's a quote that seems very a propos: Light is meaningful only in relation to darkness, and truth presupposes error. It is these mingled opposites which people our life, which make it pungent, intoxicating. We only exist in terms of this conflict, in the zone where black and white clash. (Louis Aragon)
    Your exploration of black and white designs really inspire me! Gayle, from Saint John,New Brunswick Canada - where the heavy coastal fog often reduces our city to shades of black and white!

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  68. Hi from a fellow Vermonter, who's enjoying things quite the opposite of black and white---flowers! I love black and white. I also love color and lots of it. I sometimes start with black and white and end up with all the colors on top...And then sometime all he colors end up under a layer of black and white. Ah, the journey! I enjoy seeing what you create and really like you style of video...Many thanks for all your sharing, Carroll on the dirt road a mile up from the fire station in Lamoille County, Vermont

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  69. I've been thinking lately of limiting myself to black and white as a way of exploring composition (it might help me focus more) not just with paint but in collage and stitching as well. Pehaps I should limit myself even further and just use paint or collage or stitch!

    Wendy, New Zealand, but shortly to be holidaying in Vermont.

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  70. I'm a color addict but I admire the work of artist doing only black and white. It reminds me the importance of value. I like a lot the freedom of the lines and the texture of your second work.
    I also am a fan of digital art and tools. Your digital collage are great!
    Thanks for sharing,
    Louise from Quebec, Canada

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  71. I always love your work and am especially drawn to black and white, both when seeing work done by other artists and creating pieces myself. Cindy L in Dallas

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  72. I love seeing how artists work with a limited palette - especially black and white. It's a great way to create dramatic compositions and under paintings if you decide to add color later on. I love what you've done with the stencils and the digital collages look amazing!

    JJ from CA

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  73. Hi Jane,
    I love black & white for the sense of mystery it evokes. After seeing your B&whites at Omega last year I did some experimenting with it. Found that playing with it helped when I felt blocked, somehow that "reduction" to tone on tone and form spoke to me and was very freeing. Often takes me to an imaginary urban landscape full of secrets, a place I've been yearning for since I was a kid in Chicago:)

    Thanks for sharing your work, as always!

    Carol M. in Minneapolis

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  74. After seeing your explorations in black & white, I've intensified my experiments with digital photos and Gelli plate prints. Many of my works don't exist in actual materials either, but are often a jumping off point for things I create on paper. Art is such a transient thing. Create and destroy and recreate is a regular and thrilling process for me. Ever recombining elements of texture, scale, shape, line, etc. Sometimes limited by the affordability of materials...but never by my imagination. Thanks for your constant inspiration Jane!

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  75. Carol from Canada
    I love the juxtaposition of black and white with bold color, so haviong b&w collage papers is always a treat. As for scale, I have made quite a number of paintings by enlarging, then dividing up what was a small original piece. I collage the divisions together. Why not? It is all collage.

    It was wonderful to introduce myself to you in Portland in March. I would have really enjoyed a conversation, but thought you might need some down time after a day of teaching!

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  76. I love the idea of scale and blowing up designs in order to redesign. The last 2 pieces are very interesting!
    Chris from California

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  77. I almost never work in black & white, although I love the look. In your Extreme Composition class I created some work that was almost black & white, with a minimal amount of yellows and reds. I really liked the results. The great thing about greys is that they can be cool or warm. It looks like you include both in your examples.

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  78. When playing with black and white on my gelli plate I liked to use white paint and print on black cardstock.

    Jessica in crofton, md

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  79. Hi, love seeing your posts. You have made me fall in love with black and white. I have been making lots of collage papers amend have learned that this had been what I needed to add. I am still trying to work on scale as I seem to use the same scale in most of my prints. Been practicing a lot. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

    Dee in Plano, TX

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  80. I'm really enjoying your black and white series. I tend to work mostly with colour but love your creations and series. I want to try a series in b & w now for sure! Bev in Ontario

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  81. After watching your tutorials, I've been busy painting papers and using them for collage. I really love how a pop of black & white can really bring a piece together. Playing with the scale of a print would really open up all kinds of possibilities. Janice in VA

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  82. I have been fascinated with black and white since your workshop with Leo Ragouzeos. The feeling of the India ink on Yupo is addictive! Thank you for this giveaway.
    Missy from the bayou

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  83. I have been experimenting with an assortment OPEN Acrylics recently on my Gelli Plate. I may put all but the black and white paints away and keep it simple for a bit. Fewer choices should be very freeing! Lisa from Moorpark

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  84. After watching you make collage papers I've started using more of my stamps and just plain writing on tissue paper, often using it for my morning journaling and then using it in my work. I love watching your work; hope to take your workshop when you come to Traverse City next year. Liz from West Michigan

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  85. I like the contrast of black and white and the simplicity of it. Often not knowing which colour to choose it's nice to go back to basics. Learning how to use scale effectively is also something I need to work on after taking your online composition course. Looking forward to taking more classes with you Jane.

    Rita from Castlegar

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  86. I am fascinated by black and white splashed across a canvas or dropped on a piece of newspaper and smeared into shapes. I use lots of bright acrylics daily in my art black and white always show up sometimes in a line largely scribbled or somtetimes in a tiny dot. Bebe (Belinda) in Omaha.

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  87. I am a color fanatic, but when it comes to writing letters I absolutely love the look of artful lettering black letters on white/vanilla and white letters on black paper.

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  88. your black and white work feels strong to me and the ideas of playing with scale on the computer is wonderful...you are inspiring. Kathy Plourde from Gallatin

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  89. your black and white work feels strong to me and the ideas of playing with scale on the computer is wonderful...you are inspiring. Kathy Plourde from Gallatin

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  90. the black and white shows good use of values. I like to photocopy my favorite marbled papers and/or hand painted papers so I can feel freer to do experiments on them. Sue from Fairbanks, AK

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  91. Carol from Utah. I love black and white photos and lettering (envelope art). I tend to wear too much black and grey probably, but I can hardly wait to get to the color after making an ink drawing! Thanks for the chance to win some golden supplies!

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  92. I like the polarity of black and white AND large and small scale. I noticed in the 1st piece- the stencil you made yourself, that the stencil was a small scale in the 1st coat, then you worked over it and used a similar, but larger scale stencil. The use of these "opposites" always offers a bit of tension and interest. Ellen from Houston ( soggy, but dealing with it )

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  93. I seldom think about using really large scale items. Thanks for the reminder. I really like the dramatic effect in your pieces.

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  94. I like the variety of scale in the 2nd to the last image listed under digital collage. Nice use of computer aided design. I also like the calligraphic marks in the second image from the top.
    Always enjoy receiving your posts. Thanks, Marie in Connecticut

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  95. Here is Vlasta from CR, my regards!
    Though I personally don't like much working in balck/white, I think it is a very useful approach. In the limited color range, the composition seems to pop out more distinctly and, especially, I like how the depth as if calls for the observer's eyes attention. I often wonder how to get depth to my pieces, so I think it can be useful for me to overcome my prejudice towards back/white and go for some experiments :-) As regards the scale, I noticed that a changed scale in some of the patterns can affect the whole composition and also the feeling of depth, again. Interesting, worth of eploration.

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  96. I'm not used to working in black and white only, but I love black and white over watercolor.
    Lilotte, Martigues, France

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  97. I think working with black and white enables me to focus more on texture, line weight, shapes, forms and marks in general. Perhaps it is more possible to go crazy with pattern, too. Somehow in black and white all kinds of patterns fit. I have been trying your "elements" exercises. Sometimes only playing with scale but keeping other elements fixed. Sometimes limiting color, only going black and white. I am also incorporating "text" as an element. It does not have to be legible, but as it embodies a lot of the elements in itself (lines, curves) it is interesting to play with, too. A page filled with text on different scales also opens up possibilities. Ozge Basagac from Izmir, Turkey

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  98. I love the video tutorial you posted on SGP last week! Such a great idea to create black and white elements to collage into one's work! I really like the idea that a black-and-white (achromatic) pattern can be incorporated into other color palettes, too -- like my paintings and art journal! Thank you for the inspiration, Jane! Mary from St. Louis :)

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  99. I use Photoshop to work with my photos to use in my mixed media pieces - I like the concept of doing studies to work from, inspiring. I also liked the black and white layers with the fence stencil - you can do so much with black and white including going over it with colored glazes.

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  100. I'm taking your composition class right now and these black and white pieces are examples for the first lesson for sure. Thank You.

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  101. I've made a few attempts at commenting, but Google hasn't played ball. This is my last attempt.

    Although I design and work in colour I always try to scan artwork and convert to black and white to check on tonal value. I've never tried to start with b/w and then add colour. Maybe that is the next step. Thanks for the inspiration.

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  102. Jane, I love black and white explorations and enjoy adding one accent color for interest such as quinacridone gold for warmth, etc.. I plan to work more on creating depth and atmosphere with veiling/layering in the black/white/greys. I'd love for you to offer an online class in primarily black/white paint and collage. I'd definitely sign up.

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  103. I am playing with black and white as a background - mostly typography in large and small scale - and then adding color in the form of flowers cut from pre-printed paper. I have made two so far as samples with the plan of using what I learn to make an art quilt. I'll send you a jpg if you're interested in seeing what I've come up with so far!
    - Lori Kay in Watertown MA

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  104. Hi, I'm Denise in Arizona. I have never used merely black and white in my art. I tend to be sunny and colorful. But I love what you are doing here with the neutrals and with the stencils on the gelli plate. I may have to try this myself. Thanks for sharing!

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  105. I always go back to black and white when I have a bit of a creative block. I love to just start making big loopy marks with either black paint or India ink to get my brain out of my work. Works every time! And doodling....absolutely the best with a black Sharpie and pure white sketch book for getting creative juices to flow. Maybe not fine art but creative expression. Carol from just outside Chicago.

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  106. The black and white have a lot of depth.

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  107. I love using black and white when I need to clear my thinking. The idea behind creating scale drawings is to allow the drafter to create a drawing which is proportionately the same as the artifact or idea it represents. Combining the two is a fun challenge.
    Jill from CA

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  108. I love the look of black and white. I should challenge myself to stick to simplicity more often
    Michelle from San Antonio

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  109. Hi! I just wrote a really long comment that disappeared into a huge void! Two scale references already before getting to the art - just know same image in lots of sizes can be really effective.
    Christine in a very damp Texas!

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  110. I tend to veer away from black and white work because I, so, LOVE color. Thanks for putting the thought of working in just black and white into my focus. It will be a great challenge.
    Peggy from California

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  111. Replies
    1. super lame-oh kiddo, trying to spam this!

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  112. I love the drama of black and white. All the subtle shades of grey give such depth to a piece. Tracy in Adelaide.

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  113. It is all black and white I may go to color, but black and white shows everything. Look up Rita Britt. I think that is how to spell it

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  114. Love black and white...Beautiful work...

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