Thursday, March 1, 2012

Loose Sketchbook Pages



In the process of making the large pieces (see previous posts on working large) I used a lot of paint-lifting technique: apply paint -> place a sheet of paper over the paint -> brayer or rub the back of the paper -> remove paper.  To see this technique take a look at the video in Working Large, and scroll up to about 9:30.  This results in many sheets of 9"x12" cheap drawing paper with gorgeous print-making like paint impressions.  I re-use the sheets several times, so they can get kind of interesting.  I thought about binding these sheets into a sketchbook, but decided instead to use them for experimentation, only in individual sheets. 

Here I experimented with India Ink, graphite crayon, and white China marker over the paint lifting sheet, which has only acrylic paint.

I started building on the grid established in the paint-lifting sheet, and added some scribbling in graphite crayon.

I got into a DOT study here, using acrylic paint, a brush, and the eraser end of a new wood pencil. 

Just more acrylic paint on this one.  A beginning.
  

More dots:
 

Here I'm just playing with brush stroke sizes to create the sense of depth:

An ink doodle, and then more paint:
  

 This byproduct of my new large paintings is a great excuse for playing with line, form, pattern, etc., and for experimenting with new materials (in this case graphite crayons - I used 9B, and white China marker, as well as India ink).   None of these can be "finished" drawings, because the paper is too flimsy.  This is quite liberating, as it frees me to keep milking them for new discoveries. 

As you may know, I will be teaching a Sketchbook Practice Workshop online beginning April 4.  We will be cultivating this sense of play and experimentation in order to broaden your                           abilities and sensibilities.  I've decided to include a section on working on large loose drawing paper, and also working tiny, just to stretch your sense of scale.  Fun fun!

7 comments:

  1. Fun! and really interesting. I have to say I've not been a sketchbook enthusiast before, but lately I seem to have a lot of acrylic paints left on my palette after working with them. I recently started just moving it to a sketchbook - with whatever I have handy. I'm quickly seeing the appeal of spontaneous creation! I do like what you have done here. I like it a LOT!

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  2. Oh Jane, I do LOVE the direction your work is taking...FABULOUS

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  3. Those chunky Lyra's make cool marks..dig your experiments! I really like it when you add in a bit of earth tones...cc

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  4. I love these experiments, Jane!

    I am also very fond of using cheap paper ~ it works for me!

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  5. Love the sense of freedom and experimentation.. and b & w... I so appreciate you willingness to share and inspire.. THANKS

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  6. This is some wonderful play work Jane. You have inspired me to try to mix and match a little more. I have been feeling the need to broaden more lately. Thanks for the inspiration!

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