Friday, March 13, 2020

The Visual Sentence

I have been experimenting with a process of assembling prints (from the gel plate and foam relief plates) into pieces, which reminds me of stringing words together to make sentences. Each print has a few elements - they are not just all-over patterns - and combining them offers a fresh approach to 'composing'. I learned this process from Joyce Silverstone at North Country Studio Workshops last January. See my post about it here. Whereas in a collage, your substrate determines the boundaries of the piece, in 'scrolling' (Joyce's term for the process), you assemble the parts without a substrate and make up the boundaries as you go along.





Above are a few pieces that I assembled visually, and then scanned the parts and put them together digitally. These are available as prints and products on Pixels/Fine Art America.

I will be teaching "The Visual Sentence" later this year in Montreal, and next year at Hudson River Valley Art Workshops. Stay tuned to my calendar.

14 comments:

  1. Love, love, love this process. Thanks for the craft foam demo.

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  2. thank you Jane for another excellent idea - craft foam is a new one to me and I look forward to using it

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    1. I think it is officially called "scratch foam".

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  3. Hi Jane, do you have any dates for your workshop in Montreal? I don't see it on Lucie Michel's website. I'm in Montreal, and I really want to come! -Lynda

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    1. Yes! October 23 - 25. It is not posted yet because I have to get more info to Lucie.

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  4. This is really interesting. Thank you so much. I can't wait to give it a try.

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  5. Very cool. Beautiful work! Love the phrase "Visual Sentence".

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  6. now do you consider "being put together digitally" are you printing them digitally as well?

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    1. They are available on Pixels/Fine Art America, so I am not doing any printing at all. What I do is scan each section and then assemble them in Photoshop. First I assemble them on the table or floor, and take photos of the various possibilities. I use those as guidelines for the Photoshop assembly. Before showing them as original pieces, I will assemble them by hinging with a paper tape, and mount them on a backing board, then frame under glass. I'm just not in a hurry to do that until I schedule a showing. I haven't altered the individual prints in Photoshop; it's just a visual assembly tool.

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    2. thank you for the information. This is a process I am really interested in. I do have access to a press, and I did email Joyce about the plastic she uses, so I got some of those to test.

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  7. Hi Jane! Collin Leech here! Now I finally know what to do with my Open Acrylics! This looks so fun, thank you.

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    1. Great to hear from you, Collin! Yes, this is a GREAT use for OPEN acrylics.

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  8. I love your videos! I am always so inspired by you! I do want to ask on the mask is cheap drawing paper but is what you are actually putting collage pieces on "cheap drawing paper too? I understand the substrate from BLick but was curious if the masking and the actually pieces are all from the same soure?
    Thank you and again .....for your talent we all thank you!

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  9. I love your videos, too. Scratch board, does this come in a pad from Blick or single sheets?
    I woul like to experiment with this technique . There is no limit to making art!

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