Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Red and Black Series Part 2

It seems as if Working In Series resonated with many of you, and I've had a lot of requests to offer an online course on it.  Thanks for your interest!  I will consider that for the upcoming year.  Meanwhile, my online course Extreme Composition, includes many exercises that require working in series.  And I am offering a one-day workshop at Art and Soul on Working In Series.  All my longer workshops in 2014 will emphasize series as process.

Here is Part 2 of the red and black pieces I started last week.  The transparent material I'm using on these is drafting film.  It is like vellum, but (unlike vellum) it works really well in collage.  It is also an interesting surface for painting.

And here are the pieces. They are still in process:




In this one I used deli paper scribble-painted with white.  No drafting film.


And here are the two sheets of drafting film I show in the video:

This is India ink applied with an oiler boiler.  After it dried, I applied a gentle thin coat of matte medium so that it would not smear.  It smeared a tiny bit, but will not smear further.

This is the one with dark gray Pitt Pen, and oiler boiler application of India ink over it.

16 comments:

  1. Great technique video....Love the india ink over the pitt pen. So cool. xox

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  2. OH my...your videos are always inspiring. If only I could remember it all when in the studio.

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  3. Love this new series - just gorgeous! Great video as well.

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  4. Really interesting work Jane. I love that you have so many different things going on at once!
    Never heard of an oiler boiler and I like the result. ORdering one NOW!

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  5. Do you have to clean out the tip of the oiler boiler every time you are done?

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    1. Not so far, but I've see another product called a fineline precision applicator:
      http://www.dickblick.com/products/fineline-precision-applicators/
      This seems to be a better design: a non-clogging lid. Just tried one yesterday, and I'm going to order a BUNCH of them!

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  6. Very cool, Jane! I don't have drafting film but have vellum. Why is vellum not good for collage?

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    1. Thanks. Vellum: try it and you'll see.

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  7. I too have lots of vellum; both printed and plain and colors. I've never thought of using it in collage but I guess the printed kind would work. I'll try it next time I can get to it!!

    Love the way the large Pitt pen marks and the thin ink lines look when joined. Very arty.
    And as usual, love the new ideas and thanks for posting.
    Lorraine

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    1. Do a test with the vellum. The vellum I've seen buckles up when you use it in collage this way.

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    1. There is a link in the post. Just click on "drafting film", and it takes you to a page on Blick's web site.

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  9. Jane - do you buy the 1-sided or 2-sided drafting film. I'm guessing that the .003 thickness is better for collage.... ?

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    1. I buy the one sided, just because it's a bit cheaper. I don't think it makes a difference. I tried both. The .003 is fine. I've only dabbled in this so far, so I don't have mature opinions on it. LOVE the material, though.

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    2. I had just ordered a roll of vellum from Blick .. which arrived last week. That was before I saw this tutorial :-) I love the feel of the vellum, but I take your word for it not being a good choice. I'll give the vellum a try and see what happens. Then order some drafting film :-)

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